News

Fashion News: Baby bikini onesie is one step too far for parents

The bikini had its 66th birthday this week – and it’s still stirring up trouble. First, the trouble:

Parents in Southaven, Miss., are complaining about a baby onesie on sale at a local department store that’s printed to look like a woman’s figure wearing a bikini. ”It gives people the wrong idea too quickly,” one father said. To think only a couple of years ago, all we had to worry about was tweens’ clothing being overly sexualized, not babies.

Now the birthday: The bikini was introduced to the world by designer Louis Réard in Paris on July 5,  1946, changing the look of women’s swimwear forever. An engineer who also helped run his mother’s clothing boutique, he marketed the garment as being ”smaller than the world’s smallest bathing suit.” The only woman who would model his prototype was Micheline Bernardini,  a 19-year-old nude dancer at the Casino de Paris. How times have changed. Fashionista looks back through the years at famous bikinis (like Princess Leia’s slave ensemble and Marilyn Monroe’s suit  in “Something’s Got to Give.”)

The fall couture shows in Paris wrapped up with models wearing beaded face masks at Maison Martin Margiela, textured gowns at Valentino and fantasy one-of-a-kind clothes at Jean Paul Gaultier.
Bette Midler and her daughter Sophie were front and center among viewers of the Gaultier show.
Hedi Slimane’s first two collections as creative director for Yves Saint Laurent were shown only to customers, no media allowed, but word is leaking out that the resort collection he showed in Paris this week hearkened back to the label’s founder with cigarette pants, tuxedo shirts, skinny suits and little silk dresses.

In its August issue, Seventeen magazine plans to run an editor’s letter pledging to use only “real girls and models who are healthy” (i.e., not underweight) and not to digitally alter photos to change a model’s face or body shape. To prove they are sticking to what they are calling the “body peace treaty,”  the staff will post behind-the-scenes images from photo shoots on its Tumblr blog.

Christian Louboutin on Wednesday unveiled the slipper he’s created in honor of  Disney’s planned “Cinderella” Diamond Edition release on Blu-ray this fall. The mini-platform heels are made of white lace and Swarovski crystals — glass would have been kind of dangerous — with Louboutin’s signature red sole. These shoes won’t be available for purchase. Instead, 20 pairs are to be given away. Details about the giveaway are to be announced in August.

online dating scammers

Posted by admin | online dating scammers | Tags: | Sunday 5 February 2012 12:57 pm

Beware of online dating scammers looking to swindle you out of cash

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, and some consumers are banking on online dating as a way to hatch a serious relationship. Unfortunately, some fraud artists are also banking on online dating as a way to scam people out of their money.

Relationship scams, also known as sweetheart swindles, often follow this pattern:

You meet someone on a dating site and things get serious. You send messages, talk on the phone, trade pictures and maybe even make marriage plans. Soon you find out the person you met, who claimed to be an American professional, is going to Nigeria or another country for work. Once he or she is there, that person needs your help, asking you to wire money.

The first transfer may be small, but it’s followed by requests for more. You’re told your money is needed to cover costs for a sudden illness, surgery for a son or daughter, or for a plane ticket back to the United States. The promise is always to pay you back. You even might get documents or calls from lawyers as “proof.”

But as genuine as the relationship and requests for money might seem, they’re part of an elaborate scam. The money that was wired – and the person you thought you knew and loved – will be gone.

“These relationship scams are often a long, drawn-out process where the con artist nurtures a relationship, then convinces the victim to send money,” Commerce and Insurance’s Consumer Affairs Director Gary Cordell said. “These scammers have been known to steal the real names and photos of U.S. service personnel to set up a fake profile, and prey on the sympathy and patriotism of victims. They also have also been known to use religious singles sites, using religion as a ploy to gain trust before asking for money. Any time someone you’ve never met in person asks for money, it’s usually a warning sign that something isn’t right.”

“Always use caution and common sense when dealing with someone you haven’t met in person,” Cordell said. “Never wire money to someone you meet online, no matter how compelling their story or how strong their appeal to your emotions might be.”

Signs that you may be dealing with a scammer:

The pictures posted on the person’s profile mostly seem to be professional quality model images, instead of candid pictures from a person’s everyday life. If a picture looks too good to be true, it probably is.
The online companion professes love way too early in your interaction with him or her.
You are asked to send money for gifts, a sick relative or a plane ticket to the U.S.
The person claims to be a U.S. citizen working in another country, claims to be well off or a person of important status.
The person makes excuses about not being able to speak by phone.
The person’s writing includes frequent spelling or grammar mistakes.

Proceed with caution with online dating. Even if you use only dating sites whose reputations are well-established, still keep your wits about you.